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Since 2011 we have been empowering regional communities to rethink plastic bottles in a new way.

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1. Investigation

Every new PET Lamp Project starts with a research deep dive aimed at seeking answers to 3 critical questions:


Is a collaboration logistically possible?

Is there a strong weaving tradition that we can elevate through collaboration?

Will this project be of benefit to the artisans?


Through this process we learn all about the artisans, their community, culture, and weaving practices, so we can move onto the next step, well informed but open minded to all possibilities!

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2. Workshops

If the Investigation proves fruitful and the artisans are enthusiastic about a collaboration, the PET Lamp Team will travel to their location, sometimes for as much as a month, to undertake arguably the most important step in the creation of a new Collection.


The workshops serve as an in depth information exchange; with the artisans articulating the nuances of their weaving skills and traditions, while the PET Lamp Team shares their design expertise and insight gained from prior collections.


Together, we explore, design and build prototypes of what will hopefully become a yet-to-be-named new PET Lamp Collection.

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3. Formalising Product & Relationships

With the prototypes back in the ACdO Studio, the PET Lamp Team sets about establishing how best to turn the shades into fully functioning, electrified Lamps:


Supporting components, cable options, ceiling attachments, and packaging are all designed, built and tested to ensure a consistent, high quality, beautiful product is ready to leave the studio.


With the artisans input, we get the fancy pens out to formalise the partnership, so all parties can be secure in the knowledge of what is expected of them, and how they will benefit from the collaboration!

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4. Continued Engagement

A new PET Lamp Collection often receives a warm reception from the Design World, but the work doesn’t stop once the Exhibitions and Fairs are over!


We believe that the success of a collection resides in its consistency and longevity, and this is why we build strong relationships with our artisans, and keep them updated as to how our customers are responding to their shades!


We also put a great deal of effort into our free printed newsletters that get shipped with every PET Lamp: It is a document designed to give every collection equal footing, and to tell the project’s story in order to raise awareness of the issues that the PET Lamp Project addresses, and to inspire readers to join us on the journey!

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Since PET Lamp’s launch in 2012 we have taken the project all over the Globe, working with incredible communities and artisans to build up 8 completely unique collections. Here’s to many, many more!

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Colombia

Eperara 1
Emerita Chirimio.
Eperara 2
Manuela Dura.
Eperara 2
Mélida Valencia.

Colombia

Colombia is a country defined by diversity: Drawing from European colonisation, African influences in the North, and a multitude of indigenous communities, the country’s multiracial population is spread over geography ranging from the lush rainforests of the Amazon up to the frozen heights of the Andes.
In 2012, the PET Lamp Team travelled to Colombia to embark on the very first PET Lamp Project. With the assistance of Artesanías de Colombia, we collaborated with two distinct indigenous communities; The Eperara-Siapidara, and Guambianos who despite hailing from the Cauca region, struggle with poverty in Bogota having been displaced by conflict.

Product produced

In 2013, the PET Lamp Team set its sights on Chimbarongo. Located 150km South of Santiago, the rich soil and dry climate of the region has made it particularly well suited to the cultivation of wicker that was introduced to Chile by Spanish Colonists. Chimbarongo is now recognised as the wicker capital of the country, and our resulting collection reflects the austere beauty of this strong and simple material.
We returned to Chile in 2016, this time to collaborate with the Mapuche women of Huentelolen in the Araucania Region. These women pass from one generation to the next a 500 year old weaving tradition that makes use of Ñocha, a plant that thrives in the well irrigated soil. The knowledge and skill they have built up over the centuries ensured a grand, striking collection that proved that the PET Lamp Project could succeed, even in a region notorious for conflict.

Chile

Product produced

Chile

Mapuche 1
Delia Maliqueo.
Mapuche 2
Juana Maribur.
Mapuche 3
María Inés Aniñir.

Chile

In 2013, the PET Lamp Team set its sights on Chimbarongo. Located 150km South of Santiago, the rich soil and dry climate of the region has made it particularly well suited to the cultivation of wicker that was introduced to Chile by Spanish Colonists. Chimbarongo is now recognised as the wicker capital of the country, and our resulting collection reflects the austere beauty of this strong and simple material.
We returned to Chile in 2016, this time to collaborate with the Mapuche women of Huentelolen in the Araucania Region. These women pass from one generation to the next a 500 year old weaving tradition that makes use of Ñocha, a plant that thrives in the well irrigated soil. The knowledge and skill they have built up over the centuries ensured a grand, striking collection that proved that the PET Lamp Project could succeed, even in a region notorious for conflict.

Product produced

Manuela-Dura-22
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy.

Ethiopia

Manuela-Dura-22
Kasech Demeke.
Kenenye Lemma.
Banchyayhu Mulualem with her daughter Mahilet.

Ethiopia

Ethiopia possesses the most UNESCO World Heritage sites in Africa, and is a truly ancient land with many fascinating cultural, religious and architectural notes. The colourful baskets of Ethiopia are no exception and are regarded as functional, decorative and sacred elements throughout the country.
In Addis Abeba, Salem Kasshun has positioned her shop to specialise in basketwork. By gathering her own group of highly skilled weavers she has been able to achieve a greater flexibility and capacity for experimentation, making Salem’s Ethiopia the perfect collaborator for the PET Lamp Project.

Product produced

Japan, in Asia’s far east, first encountered Buddhism in the late 6th century, which was introduced from China after spreading from India. Many Chinese and Korean craft techniques and inventions followed. Japan’s openness to other civilizations eventually came to an end, when, from the 17th to the mid-19th centuries, Japan cloistered itself from the outside world. This policy was so isolating that Japanese society developed in unique and often magnificent ways.
Eventually, bamboo became an essential material in tea ceremony culture as it developed during the 16th century, when every tool used in a ceremony, including the décor set around the room, was considered to convey important and holistic expressions of aesthetics, values and hospitality.
In the ancient capital of Kyoto, where many of Japan’s most elaborate fine crafts were established, highly delicate bamboo craftsmanship became one of the city’s signature industries, and master artisans passed their skills and titles—along with their pride—to successive generations.

Japan

Product produced

Japan

Japan 1
Chiemi Ogura.
Japan 2
Hideaki Hosokawa.

Japan

Japan, in Asia’s far east, first encountered Buddhism in the late 6th century, which was introduced from China after spreading from India. Many Chinese and Korean craft techniques and inventions followed. Japan’s openness to other civilizations eventually came to an end, when, from the 17th to the mid-19th centuries, Japan cloistered itself from the outside world. This policy was so isolating that Japanese society developed in unique and often magnificent ways.
Eventually, bamboo became an essential material in tea ceremony culture as it developed during the 16th century, when every tool used in a ceremony, including the décor set around the room, was considered to convey important and holistic expressions of aesthetics, values and hospitality.
In the ancient capital of Kyoto, where many of Japan’s most elaborate fine crafts were established, highly delicate bamboo craftsmanship became one of the city’s signature industries, and master artisans passed their skills and titles—along with their pride—to successive generations.

Product produced

Manuela-Dura-22
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy.

Australia

Ramingining 1
DJILIRR LILIPIYANA, Judith.
Ramingining 2
GEDJIN LILIPIYANA, Melinda.
Ramingining 3
DHAPALANY MANDHALPUYNU, Mary.

Australia

For almost 65,000 years, the Aboriginal population of Australia lived in complete isolation and conserved a unique culture and ecosystem. Upon arrival of the Europeans at the end of the 18th century, the Aboriginal community was made up of a number of tribes that shared a worldview where the physical (the earth), the human and the sacred were totally integrated.
The Aboriginal vision was not taken into consideration by the colonists, where the European perspective predominated: exploitation of natural resources, accumulation by status, in which human superiority (European) overrode other considerations to create a society that was highly individualistic.
These fundamental differences led to a gap between Aboriginal and non- Aboriginal communities, leaving us with the task of discovering, accepting, transmitting and programming the knowledge of local peoples. In the search for this wealth, and to enable it to be valued by many more, we have sought communities where the traditions and worldview are conserved in their purest form. We had the opportunity to work together to take these paintings and give them back their living form as textiles.

Product produced

The character of Thai basketry tradition comes from the artisan’s calmness which is reflected through extremely precise and balanced pieces. Bamboo is the chosen material – typical of the Southeast Asia region– worked with precision and careful detail by the best craftsmen of the country.
As in previous occasions –through a methodology based on field research, prototyping and on-site workshops– PET Lamp has developed a collection of lampshades in collaboration with the Traditional Bamboo Handicraft Center, a foundation supported by her Majesty Queen Sirikit that enjoys a distinct reputation in the field of handicrafts in the country.
PET Lamp Pikul takes its name after the Mimusops Elengi’s flower. Also known as Spanish Cherry tree, it is a tropical tree found in the forests of this region of Asia. The flower grows in a geometric pattern inspiring the traditional Pikul pattern which can be found in many of the crafts around Thailand.
This material requires the skill and mastery of three craftsmen, each one specialized in one of the techniques of the manufacturing processes required to make each lamp.

Thailand

Product produced

Thailand

Pikul 1
Kannika Chalong.
Pikul 2
Phayom Arruno.
Pikul 3
Aumporn Somboonsatcha.

Thailand

The character of Thai basketry tradition comes from the artisan’s calmness which is reflected through extremely precise and balanced pieces. Bamboo is the chosen material – typical of the Southeast Asia region– worked with precision and careful detail by the best craftsmen of the country.
As in previous occasions –through a methodology based on field research, prototyping and on-site workshops– PET Lamp has developed a collection of lampshades in collaboration with the Traditional Bamboo Handicraft Center, a foundation supported by her Majesty Queen Sirikit that enjoys a distinct reputation in the field of handicrafts in the country.
PET Lamp Pikul takes its name after the Mimusops Elengi’s flower. Also known as Spanish Cherry tree, it is a tropical tree found in the forests of this region of Asia. The flower grows in a geometric pattern inspiring the traditional Pikul pattern which can be found in many of the crafts around Thailand.
This material requires the skill and mastery of three craftsmen, each one specialized in one of the techniques of the manufacturing processes required to make each lamp.

Product produced

Ghana

Manuela-Dura-22
Anamolika Azure.
Manuela-Dura-22
Celina Nmabila Apasinore.

Ghana

Bolgatanga, one of the most remote towns in Ghana, was the location chosen to develop the PET Lamp 2019 project.
In the heart of the Upper East Region and just a few kilometres from Burkina Faso, Bolgatanga is known as the “city of baskets” and is also the capital of the Gurunsi people. The importance given to basket weaving in this territory is one of the main reasons why we decided to go to this remote corner of Africa to develop a new PET Lamp. Traditional basket weaving is regarded not only as a tool for day to day life and a livelihood for these people, it also helps to provide greater social cohesion and embodies the values expressed in their culture. All this makes basketry the biggest industry in this region.
This workshop was one of the most rewarding we have worked on to date. We discovered a country full of surprises and were able to enjoy a close and easy-going relationship with the artisans, from whom we learnt the secrets of a technique full of riches. The experience also allowed us to open a window to enable them to update their traditional basketry by integrating PET bottles, which are a real and ongoing problem in this part of Ghana.

Product produced

Newspaper
Newspaper